Tech

Heinz actually uses the ad campaign from ‘Mad Men’ and we’re not sure what’s real anymore

Draper pitches ads to Heinz execs.

It’s said that life imitates art. That seems especially true if you’re a ketchup company, and said art contains a bunch of free ideas for selling ketchup.

Heinz is pulling its latest ad campaign straight from the smoke-filled boardrooms of Mad Men’s Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce.

The condiment brand plans to run a set of billboards and print ads cribbed from a pitch Don Draper made to a fictionalized version of the company in the AMC series.

The ads are stark and minimalist in the understated style typical of Draper, the consummate purist. Each consists only of a mouth-watering food close-up and a slogan: "Pass the Heinz."

"It’s simple, and it’s tantalizingly incomplete," Draper says in one of his signature ruminative pitches.

The unimpressed Heinz executives on the show put it a different way: "It feels like half an ad."

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Their real-life modern counterparts were evidently more receptive to Draper’s high-minded nonsense. It probably helps that tying an ad to a popular TV show ensures that several articles like this one will be written about it, guaranteeing free publicity.

Image: heinz Image: heinz Image: heinz

The ads even came complete with a typewriter-style press release set in the show’s fictional universe.

There’s no word on whether the stunt might stir up a classic agency showdown between Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and DAVID Miami, the company’s current (and very real) ad agency.

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